Facial recognition, what Amazon, Microsoft and IBM have decided

Facial recognition, what Amazon, Microsoft and IBM have decided

Like Amazon, Microsoft will also wait to sell its technology to the police until the United States approves a law governing its use. The position of Ibm is different, definitively leaving the sector of facial recognition


Only the company founded by Bill Gates was missing. Microsoft will also not sell facial recognition to the police until federal regulation comes into effect.

Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, said yesterday that the company will ban sales of facial recognition software to the police until federal technology regulations are approved. The Washington Post (owned by Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon) reported it for the first time.

The announcement follows slightly that of the rival Amazon, which will suspend the use of the police for its "Rekognition" service for one year and that of I bm, which will come out of the facial recognition business .

Positions come when tech companies face more control over their contracts with the police.

THE MICROSOFT STATEMENT

"We don't sell our facial recognition technology to the US police departments and until there is solid national human rights law, we won't." It reads in the note released by Microsoft.

THE FOLLOW-UP OF AMAZON FOLLOWS

This week, Amazon Web Services (Amazon's cloud division) also enacted a one-year moratorium to stop police from using its facial recognition technology, Rekognition, calling for federal regulation.

AND THAT OF IBM

However, IBM thought about kicking off. Earlier this week the CEO of Arvind Krishna said IBM had stopped selling facial recognition software altogether. Not only that, the company will also stop developing the technology.

It is equally true that facial recognition did not bring much fruit to IBM. Technology is really in its infancy and there are few applications where it makes sense for society.

THE PROTEST OF ORGANIZATIONS FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Prior to yesterday's announcement, civil rights organizations including Aclu had asked Microsoft to follow Amazon's and IBM's moves. "Microsoft, which released a series of statements in support of Black Lives Matter, did not ban the sale of its facial recognition system to the police departments," Aclu wrote in a Twitter post.

DUE TO A CONTROVERSE TECHNOLOGY

Concerns about drift towards mass surveillance through the use of facial recognition are further reinforced by the problem of technology accuracy.

Studies and research have shown that facial analysis is less accurate for people with darker skin tones, confirming the fears of civil rights activists that false matches could lead to unjust arrests by the police.

THE FACIAL RECOGNITION SOFTWARE SOLD THROUGH MICROSOFT AZURE

Microsoft promotes facial recognition technology as part of its Azure cloud computing business. The website reads that developers can "incorporate facial recognition into your apps for a smooth and highly secure user experience." Uber uses it to "help ensure that the driver using the app matches the account entered on the platform."

NO TO SALES TO THE POLICE

Yesterday Smith said that Microsoft currently does not sell facial recognition technology to the U.S. police. But as Reuters pointed out , neither Microsoft nor Amazon responded to a request for comment that their bans also applied to law enforcement in the United States in general.

BUT THE BUSINESS CONTINUES

A Microsoft spokesman said in a statement that the company "is also taking the opportunity to further strengthen the review processes for all customers who want to use this technology on a large scale."


This is a machine translation from Italian language of a post published on Start Magazine at the URL https://www.startmag.it/innovazione/riconoscimento-facciale-cosa-hanno-deciso-amazon-microsoft-e-ibm-amazon/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=riconoscimento-facciale-cosa-hanno-deciso-amazon-microsoft-e-ibm-amazon on Fri, 12 Jun 2020 06:53:28 +0000.